Friday, August 26, 2005

"A Wonderful Time To Be A Soldier"

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This outstanding essay- from Sgt Joe Roche, U.S. Army- reminds us of what we already know... but it is very good to be reminded by someone like this. (Hat tip to SAJ.)

[[ I'm very proud to be a soldier of the U.S. Army because of the war on terror and our missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. I'm not alone either. I'm surrounded by soldiers who are re-enlisting and volunteering to go to units that are deploying. In fact, despite all the negative news and protests, I see everyday that our military is actually doing very well.

This is quite obvious, except for the fact that most of the media seems asphyxiated with defeatism. The message from most journalists would lead you to believe that we soldiers are getting out, that no one is joining anew and that we want to stop fighting. This simply isn't true.

The fact is that we are not experiencing casualty rates anywhere near past conflicts, nor for that matter as bad as during peacetime. There were weeks in Vietnam when 350-400 Americans died, and in other wars thousands would die in single battles. Nothing like that is happening now.

From 1983 to 1996, more than 18,000 soldiers died. That averages to more than 1,300 a year, far more than have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan each year. Yes, that was mostly from accidents, drunk driving and other mishaps. Yet, while protesters in Crawford, Texas and elsewhere would have you think that our military can't survive with the low casualty rates of this war, I wonder why they were willing to accept the much higher peacetime casualty rates of the past? We lost around 3,000 innocent people on September 11, and with four years of war and the toppling of two regimes, we haven't lost that many in combat.
]] (LINK to superb column - may need free registration)

To help back up Sgt Roche's words, here is a good article on reenlistment figures- along with some good words from a General. (LINK to article)

I love this part:

[[ "The negative drumbeat that we hear is not helpful," General Schoomaker said. "The overemphasis on the negative is not helpful."

"I personally believe this is a very important undertaking," he said.

"It is very important to the security of our nation that we be successful. I think people are being very short-sighted who don't understand that.
]]

How's that for a controlled understatement?

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7 Comments:

Anonymous Tsar Lazar said...

"How's that for a controlled understatement?"

I would love to know what he was saying in his mind. Something like:

MSM sedition-spreading reporters.
Trees. Ropes.

Some assembly required.



Pomoze Bog.
Tsar Lazar

26/8/05 07:49  
Blogger kmg said...

*L*

Yeah... I can guarantee there is a big-time filter between his brain and his mouth on this one...

26/8/05 08:48  
Blogger husker_met said...

I'm gonna repost a bit of perspective I have posted elsewhere (in moonbat combat). Here goes:

For reference:
War in Iraq (19 March 2003- Present), 891 days
Total U.S. casualties: 15, 893 (wounded or killed, per http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/
2003/iraq/forces/casualties/)

Total U.S. deaths: 1,872 (as of 25 August 2005, per http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/
2003/iraq/forces/casualties/)

Average daily deaths: 2.10 for entire involvement

Number of anti-war protests in front of military hospitals: 1 every Friday


Battle of Chancellorsville (01-04 May 1863) U.S. Civil War-4 days
Total Union involvement: 12 April 1861- 07 April 1865 (1456 days)

Against a rebellion that, at that date, had never attacked a target inside the Union states.
Total Union casualties: 18,400
Total Union deaths: 13,000 (est.)
Average daily Union deaths for single battle (est.): 3,250

Number of anti-war protests in front of military hospitals: 0


Battle of Belleau Wood (06-26 June 1918), WWI- 20 days
Total U.S. Involvement: 02 April 1917- 11 November 1918 (588 days)

Against a country that never attacked a target inside the political boundaries of the United States:
Total U.S. casualties: 9,777 casualties, most incurred in the first day
Total U.S. deaths:1,811
Average daily U.S. deaths for single battle: 90.55

Number of anti-war protests in front of military hospitals: 0


Battle of Kasserine Pass (19-20 February 1942), WWII-2 days
Total U.S. Involvement: 07 Dec 1941- 21 August 1945 (1353 days)

Against a country that never attacked a target inside the political boundaries of the United States:
Total U.S. casualties: 18,221
Total U.S. deaths: 2,715 dead
Average daily U.S. deaths for single battle: 1357.5

Number of anti-war protests in front of military hospitals: 0


Invasion of Normandy (06-08 June 1944), WWII- 2 days
Total U.S. Involvement: 07 Dec 1941- 21 August 1945 (1353 days)

Against a country that never attacked a target inside the political boundaries of the United States:
Allied Casualties: 209,000 Allied casualties (37,000 dead ground forces; 16,714 deaths in the Allied air forces)
125,847 from the US ground forces.
Average daily U.S. deaths for single battle: 62,923.5

Number of anti-war protests in front of military hospitals: 0


Battle of Chosin Reservoir (26 November–13 December 1950) Korean War- 17 days
Total U.S. Involvement: 25 June1950 - 27 July 1953 (1128 days)

Against a country that never attacked a target inside the political boundaries of the United States:
Total U.S. casualties: est. 3400
Total U.S. deaths: 1641
Average daily U.S. deaths for single battle: 96.53

Number of anti-war protests in front of military hospitals: 0

We live in no less dangerous and important times, and our enemy wants to see us no less dead than Johnny Reb, Kaiser Wilhelm, Adolph Hitler or Chairman Mao.

The difference here is that, in spite of facts to the contrary, were being led to believe by MSM and the anti-war nogoodniks that this is a bloody, protracted, and unnecessary war.

How times have changed...

26/8/05 10:15  
Blogger kmg said...

Thanks for the perspective, Husker...

I am a Marine Corps history buff... and the battle of Belleau Wood is one of my favorites. I once did a formal battle study on it for a group of two hundred Marines (we like to learn from history, imagine that!).

Between sunrise and sunset of the first day of that battle (6 June 1918), the USMC took more casualties than it had IN ITS ENTIRE EXISTENCE up to that point.

That's right... more in one day than in 143 YEARS!

Perspective is pretty important, I would say...

26/8/05 10:32  
Blogger husker_met said...

I would have liked to sit in on that briefing. I go apesh*t for that kind of stuff (particularly the analysis of the "what ifs").

Relating this to before...

You might see if you can find a newspaper from right around that time and see how it related the story.

I doubt the word "quagmire" will appear.

Also I believe Belleau Wood was where the monicker "Devil Dogs" was originally coined.

26/8/05 10:53  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think this soldier is superb, and such a great example of our professional fighting force! They have all my prayers and best wishes and support!

26/8/05 11:16  
Blogger kmg said...

Dead on, Husker.

Captured diaries from German officers referred to the Marines as warriors who fought like "Tueffel Hunden" (Devil Dogs).

We are mighty proud of that moniker...

26/8/05 11:57  

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